Old Brick Church on the James

April 2, 2007 at 10:27 am (architecture, Christianity, landscape, Virginia)

A Photo from Neddy

Jamestown Island Brick Church on the James River, from “My Picasa Album” – Jamestown Island.

The present church was built in 1907, by the National Society of Colonial Dames of America. The Church stands behind a brick tower which was erected circa 1690, and is the only surviving seventeenth-century structure at Jamestown. It is also one of the oldest English buildings in the United States. The interior of the Church contains the brick and cobblestone foundations of the original 1639 Jamestown settlement church. The James River flows beside the site. It is at this sacred place that America’s most cherished traditions of freedom were first planted. They took root well.

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The image, Old Brick Church on the James, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.

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Count the Layers

February 15, 2007 at 5:45 pm (art, Virginia)

A Photo from Neddy

Beautiful Rusty Iridescence

Captured upon the skin of the old red caboose at Haymarket, Virginia, these beauteous iridescences can be created only by the undisturbed oxidation of iron underneath of the painter’s finished handiwork. How many coats of vermilion have been flaked away thusly by such acts of nature during the lifetime of the old caboose? It is a constant struggle between man, the elements and time.

Count the layers,
Count the years,
Count the struggles,
Count the tears.
Say goodbye when counting ends;
Say goodbye.

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The image, Count the Layers, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.

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The Dove of Peace

February 11, 2007 at 8:17 pm (architecture, art, Virginia)

A Photo from Neddy

Flying High o’er the Home of the Great American Warrior, General George Washington, Mount Vernon, Virginia

As a young career soldier, George Washington claimed that he “loved the sound of whistling bullets.” Thirty years and many battles later, the same George Washington placed a dove of peace symbol on his home’s cupola.

The original Dove of Peace weathervane was made by Philadelphian Joseph Rakestraw in the summer of 1787, soon after George Washington ordered it, and was immediately sent to Mount Vernon. The actual vane was in the shape of a dove of peace, its copper body framed or bound with iron strips. In the beak of the dove was an olive branch fashioned from a sheet of iron. The bird measured forty inches long with a wing span of thirty-five inches. Washington wrote to his nephew George Augustine Washington, 12 August 1787, that “The bill of the bird is to be black and olive branch in the mouth of it is to be green.

Mount Vernon later stopped maintaining Washington’s color scheme, covering the body of the bird with gold leaf to deter further corrosion to its original copper and iron construction. Today, the original Dove of Peace is displayed in Mount Vernon’s new museum, while a replica has been installed upon the mansion’s cupola.

From whence came this “Dove of Peace” carrying an olive branch?

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The image, The Dove of Peace, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.

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The First Thanksgiving

November 22, 2006 at 2:16 pm (Virginia)

A Photo from Neddy

THANKSGIVING 1619

On December 4, 1619, English settlers stepped ashore at Berkeley Hundred along the James River of the Virginia colony and, in accordance with the proprietor’s instruction, celebrated the first official Thanksgiving Day. They vowed “the day of our ship’s arrival … shall be yearly and perpetually kept as a day of thanksgiving”.

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The image, People of Jamestown, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.

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Coat of Many Colors

October 20, 2006 at 12:44 pm (music, Virginia)

A Photo from Neddy

This is actually a “Bathrobe of Many Colors” that was made long ago in Virginia by Grace Babb Anderson Brown for Louise Brown Beardsworth. I made this photograph when it was on display during the Centennial celebration of the Fairfax County Chapter NSDAR at the Westwood Country Club in Vienna, Virginia, October 2005.

“My Coat of Many Colors” by Dolly Parton

Back through the years
I go wonderin once again
Back to the seasons of my youth
I recall a box of rags that someone gave us
And how my momma put the rags to use
There were rags of many colors
Every piece was small
And I didnt have a coat
And it was way down in the fall
Momma sewed the rags together
Sewin every piece with love
She made my coat of many colors
That I was so proud of
As she sewed, she told a story
From the bible, she had read
About a coat of many colors
Joseph wore and then she said
Perhaps this coat will bring you
Good luck and happiness
And I just couldnt wait to wear it
And momma blessed it with a kiss
Chorus:

My coat of many colors
That my momma made for me
Made only from rags
But I wore it so proudly
Although we had no money
I was rich as I could be
In my coat of many colors
My momma made for me

So with patches on my britches
Holes in both my shoes
In my coat of many colors
I hurried off to school
Just to find the others laughing
And making fun of me
In my coat of many colors
My momma made for me

And oh I couldnt understand it
For I felt I was rich
And I told them of the love
My momma sewed in every stitch
And I told em all the story
Momma told me while she sewed
And how my coat of many colors
Was worth more than all their clothes

But they didnt understand it
And I tried to make them see
That one is only poor
Only if they choose to be
Now I know we had no money
But I was rich as I could be
In my coat of many colors
My momma made for me
Made just for me.

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The image, Coat of Many Colors, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.

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Tabitha Forgotten

August 28, 2006 at 11:01 pm (holy places, Virginia) (, , , , , )

Show me your cemeteries, and I will tell you what kind of people you have.” ~~Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)Broken Tombstone, Broken Heart

Broken Tombstone ~ BROKEN HEART
The graves of Tabitha and her family are not only forgotten; they are abused, vandalized and desecrated by those who now live in upscale suburban homes upon the very Virginia land that Tabitha and James Grimseley once cared for and farmed. It is a heartbreaking disgrace for neighbors of a cemetery to treat it with such disrespect.

Grimesley Family Cemetery, Chancellor Way, near the corner of Mulberry Bottom Lane, Saratoga, Virginia (Google Map) is an old family cemetery in southern Fairfax County, Virginia, located between two suburban homes. There are carved markers for James Grimesley, his wife Tabitha, Augustine W. Grimsley, and his wife Mary. There are other unreadable stones and field-stone markers, that with each passing season are blanketed higher and higher with grass clippings, garden debris and other refuse from the living neighbors of these dead Virginians. Rubbish is dumped upon the earthly remains of these immortal souls because the present caretakers of God’s land regard the former caretakers as naught but rubbish also. More at Saving Graves.

James and Tabitha were once vibrant living beings when they lived upon this land and their names are recorded for posterity on the 1880 Census of Fairfax County in the Lee District. (James GRIMSLEY – Farming)

Poster of Tabitha Forgotten

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The image, Broken Tombstone, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.

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Portrait of a Faithful Frog

August 25, 2006 at 8:54 am (gardens, landscape, Virginia) (, , )

A Photo from Neddy

I purchased this terracotta frog ornament when I was living in Seoul, South Korea in the mid 1970s and he has decorated my gardens thence forth wherever in the world I have settled. He is one hardy soul as both his hands have suffered amputations at the hands of various less-than-caring maintenance people. Each morning he sits greeting Neddy’s world with a smile on his face. No more faithful service could be expected from anyone, much less a clay froggy.

From “My August Garden” album

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The image, Portrait of a Faithful Frog, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.

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Snow-white Church

August 24, 2006 at 3:35 pm (holy places, Virginia)

A Photo from Neddy

Clark’s Chapel ~~ The congregants of this old time country church, that now exists in the middle of the suburbs, take great pride in their place of worship, as this image shows.

“There’s a little white church in the valley
That stands in my memory each day
And it seems I can hear the bells now ringing
Though I am many miles away
“And many times in church on Sunday morning
That whole countryside would gather there
They would all kneel down by the altar
As they lifted up their voice in prayer

“They would sing the old song Rock of Ages
Oh Christ let me hide myself in thee
And I know some of them are now waiting
Just o’er the dark and stormy sea

“I know that troubles all are ended
And happy forever they will be
They are waiting and watching up yonder
For the coming home of you and me”

~~”Little White Church” by Jimmy Martin

Clark’s Church is one of those “little white churches” yet found on Virginia byways and highways. This one can be seen from Rolling Road, in the Saratoga area of Springfield, Virginia, July 2006.
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The image, Snow-white Church, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.

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The Graffiti Church

August 5, 2006 at 12:34 pm (holy places, Virginia)

A Photo from Neddy

Pohick Church Graffiti ~ Is there any church, anywhere in Virginia, more graffiti covered than George Washington’s church at Pohick?

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The image, The Graffiti Church, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.

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Graveyard at Pohick Church

August 1, 2006 at 6:35 am (architecture, gardens, holy places, Virginia)

A Photo from Neddy

Pohick Church was the parish church of Revolutionary War patriots George Washington and George Mason. It is located at the intersection of Colchester Road and Richmond Highway, Lorton, Virginia.

Pohick Church (1768-1774) was built as a brick replacement of Lewis Chapel, formerly located a few miles to the south. Its burying grounds contain interesting markers, including WILLIAM HARRIS, died 1698, the oldest surviving gravestone in Fairfax County. ALL of the gravestones before 1870, according to historian Brian Conley, were moved here from other local graveyards. This church and its grounds suffered serious neglect and abuse after the American Revolution’s disestablishment of the Anglican church, and later during the Civil War.

The image, Pohick Church Graveyard, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.

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